Self Improvement

Beginner

Supplies: paper, drawing utensils

  1. Ask the student to draw something from real life. Good examples are buildings, a family, a vehicle. The item should be reasonably complex, and not an abstract object like a circle or cloud.
  2. Ask the student to describe the object in more detail than what is in the drawing. For example, if the student draws a generic family member, ask what color shirt the father is wearing. If the student draws a car, ask how many wheels (if the student understands numbers) the car has.
  3. Ask the student to add to the drawing to incorporate the new detail. In the examples above, the student would color the father’s shirt or draw a fourth wheel.
  4. Ask the student to make a brand new drawing of the same object. Ask the student to remember the new detail to draw. Gently remind the student if the student forgets.
  5. Repeat steps 1-4 for other topics as many times as desired.
  6. Extra credit. If the student has completed the [Making Choices module], at the end of the session, ask the student to compare each pair of drawings and pick the better one. Ask the student to give a reason for each choice.

Intermediate

Supplies: paper, drawing utensils

  1. The outline is the same for intermediate students. However, the student should be encouraged to select more complex topics to draw, such as events or scenes, that incorporate many details. An example would be a recent birthday party. There are many more complex details to include and question the student about, such as the number of guests, the types of presents, color of the cake, and so on.
  2. Repeat with additional topics as many times as desired.
  3. Extra credit. If the student has completed the [Accurate Communication module], ask the student to evaluate each final picture for accuracy. The student should name three details that are accurate and three details that are inaccurate for each picture.

Advanced

Supplies: paper, drawing utensils, online resources (optional)

  1. Ask the student to pick something to draw where the student can use a model as a guide. For example, the student could draw an object such as a television or flower that is sitting in front of him or her. The student could also find a picture of a celebrity online to use as a model.
  2. Ask the student to draw the topic of choice as realistically as possible, remaining as close to the original model as possible. Drawings can be black and white or color.
  3. Ask the student the list at least three specific ways the drawing can be improved. The suggested improvements should be concrete and actionable, not general descriptions. For example, “make the drawing more realistic” is too general, while “draw the correct number of petals on the flower” is actionable. Be sure to make the distinction between actionable points and general points.
  4. Ask the student to make a new drawing incorporating at least three of the previously suggested improvements.
  5. Ask the student to make at least three more specific suggestions for the revised drawing. If extra suggestions from the previous round were not incorporated, they may be used here.
  6. Ask the student to make one more drawing incorporating at least three of the new suggestions.
  7. Ask the student to compare the first and third drawing. Ask the student to provide as many SPECIFIC reasons as possible why one drawing is better than the other. Then, ask the student to provide GENERAL reasons why one drawing is better than the other. General reasons could be better accuracy with details or improved light and shading, for example. Ask the student what he or she would need to improve the most to make a more realistic drawing.
  8. Repeat the exercise as desired.
  9. Extra credit. Ask the student to get feedback on the drawings from at least one other individual besides the teacher. The individual could be another family member or a friend. Ask the individual to name the three best details of each drawing. Have the student write down the list of best details. Now have the student make a list of details that they spent the most time drawing. Ask the student to compare these lists. How well do they correspond?

 

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