Facts Versus Opinions

Beginner

Supplies: printer, set of colored drawing utensils

  1. Ask the student to pick two favorite colored drawing utensils. They may be any two colors.
  2. Give the student a printed copy of the Facts Versus Opinions Beginner Worksheet 1A. Ask the student to color the scene using the selected two colors. The student should feel free to color the scene in any desired way. The teacher should compliment the student on the coloring.
  3. Give the student a printed copy of the Facts Versus Opinions Beginner Worksheet 1B. This time, instruct the student to color the scene using the indicated directions on the worksheet. Make sure the student follows the directions on the worksheet and gently prod the student in the correct direction if necessary. Use the closest similar color if the exact color is not available.
  4. Compare the two colored pages. Ask the student what the student likes about each page. Ask the student which colored page the student prefers. The teacher should indicate that the page the student did not select is also a wonderful picture and state something positive about both pages.
  5. Ask the student which colored page is more similar to the real world. If the student selects the fantasy scene (1A), the teacher should gently point out how the realistic scene (1B) is more similar. For example, the teacher can ask, what color is the sky, while pointing outside. If the student selects the realistic scene (1B), the teacher should reinforce the concepts by asking similar questions.
  6. Extra credit. Use the Facts Versus Opinions Beginner Worksheets 2A and 2B and repeat steps 2-5.

Intermediate

Supplies: printer, pencil, paper, drawing utensils

  1. Give the student a printed copy of the Facts Versus Opinions Intermediate Worksheet 1. Explain the difference between facts and opinions. Read through the examples on the worksheet.
  2. Ask the student to come up with at least two additional facts for the picture in the worksheet. The teacher or the student, if able, should write down the new facts on the left side.
  3. Ask the student to come up with at least two additional opinions for the picture in the worksheet. The teacher or the student, if able, should write down the new opinions on the right side. Less experienced students may need extra prompting and guidance with this step.
  4. Repeat steps 1-3 with the Facts Versus Opinions Intermediate Worksheet 2.
  5. Ask the student to pick a favorite thing and to draw it.
  6. As before, ask the student to come up with at least two facts and at least two opinions for the new drawing. Facts should be written on the left and opinions on the right.
  7. Repeat steps 5-6 at least once and continue as time and interest allows. The teacher can also take turns drawing, providing facts or opinions, or any variation.
  8. Extra credit. If the student has completed the [Making Choices module], ask the student which of the drawings from steps 5-7 is the best thing. Ask the student to use only facts to explain the choice. Then, ask the student to use only opinions to explain the choice.

Advanced

Supplies: paper, pencil, online resources (optional)

  1. Ask the student to pick a favorite person, place, or thing, and have the student write the name on a piece of paper.
  2. Ask the student to write down five sentences under the name describing the favorite choice. Each sentence should stand alone as a separate point.
  3. Ask the student the meaning of the words “Fact” and “Opinion”. Ask the student to look up the definitions in an online dictionary and read through the definitions together.
  4. Go through each written sentence and label it as “Fact” or “Opinion”. If the student disagrees, makes mistakes, or is unsure of the label, discuss why that particular sentence is a fact or opinion.
  5. Count the number of facts and opinions under each name. Ask the student to come up with additional facts or opinions, so that the description of the favorite choice includes at least three facts and three opinions.
  6. Ask the student to pick another favorite person, place, or thing and have the student write the name on a piece of paper.
  7. Ask the student to write down five sentences under the name describing the favorite choice that are only FACTS.
  8. For each FACT, ask the student to write down an OPINION that the fact could support. For example, if a fact about the mall is that there are over twenty stores, a supported opinion is that the mall is a great place for shopping.
  9. Ask the student to pick a favorite person, place, or thing and have the student write the name on a piece of paper.
  10. Ask the student to write down five sentences under the name describing the favorite choice that are only OPINIONS.
  11. For each OPINION, ask the student to write down a FACT that could support that opinion. For example, if an opinion about watermelons is that they taste delicious, a fact that provides support is that watermelons have a certain percentage of sugar. The student may wish to access online resources to find supporting facts.

Extra credit. If the student has completed the [Persuading People module], ask the student to go through each fact and opinion, and label it as appealing primarily to emotion or logic. Discuss the labels and bring up contrasting views. For example, if a fact about a pair of shoes is that they are expensive, that could appeal to logic in that the shoes may use higher quality, and hence more expensive, materials. On the other hand, if showing off expensive shoes makes someone feel good in front of others, that would appeal to emotion.

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Facts Versus Opinions Beginner Worksheet 1A

facts versus opinions worksheet 1A
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Facts Versus Opinions Beginner Worksheet 1B

facts versus opinions worksheet 2b
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Facts Versus Opinions Beginner Worksheet 2A

facts versus opinions worksheet 2a
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Facts Versus Opinions Beginner Worksheet 2B

facts versus opinions worksheet 2b
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Facts Versus Opinions Intermediate Worksheet 1

facts versus opinions intermediate worksheet 1

FACTS

The cow has black spots.

The cow is standing on mud.

The cow is smiling.

OPINIONS

The cow looks cute.

The cow should take a bath.

The cow wants to play with me.

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Facts Versus Opinions Intermediate Worksheet 2

facts versus opinions intermediate worksheet 2

FACTS

The elephant is gray.

The elephant has four legs.

The elephant has a book.

OPINIONS

The elephant is shy.

The elephant is thinking hard.

The elephant is very smart.

 

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